Info Change India

An archive of knowledge resources of social justice and sustainable development
in India

Tue12122017

Last updateSat, 22 Jul 2017 6am

Linguistic inclusion on the internet

Linguistic inclusion on the internet

By AlokeThakore

Not a single one of the Eighth Schedule Indian languages is used by more...

Net neutrality: Superhighway to digital inclusion

Net neutrality: Superhighway to digital inclusion

By Ashoak Upadhyay

If users have to pay for the services available via the internet unde...

Ambivalent internet: Freedoms and fears

Ambivalent internet: Freedoms and fears

By Shivani Gupta

The internet is not a gender-neutral space. Women from patriarchal backg...

Digital inequality in the Global South

Digital inequality in the Global South

By TT Sreekumar

Studies which focus on information and communication technologies (ICTs)...

Caste concerns in landmark e-governance projects

Caste concerns in landmark e-governance projects

By Rahul De’

Many e-governance programmes in developing countries reach into the furthes...

Features

A school with a view

By Sunandita Mehrotra

alternative educationSwajan Siksha Samiti, an alternative education school perched on a hill in Ghati village in Uttarakhand, revives local culture and encourages creative learning. It has a zero dropout rate

Swajan Siksha Samiti is perched atop a hill in Ghati village, off the tourist track in Uttarakhand. This unusual alternative school was set up by Sanjay Rawat (30) and Vikram Singh (32) in 2002.

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»Tomorrow’s children By Moushumi Basu
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»One room, two teachers, six classes By Burhan Majid
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»Report card on RTE two years after By Rashmi Gupta
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Backgrounders

Challenges in implementing the RTE Act

By Ramakant Rai

Right to education actThe budget for implementation of the RTE Act throughout the country is just half of the amount spent on the 2010 Commonwealth Games, so funds are scarcely the problem. Why is there a resistance to complete implementation of the Act from states, centre and civil society?

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»After the RTE Act, the focus is on quality of education By Mini Srinivasan
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»Why are children not in school? By Mini Srinivasan
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Analysis

The bogey of the impressionable mind

By Havovi Wadia and Arun Kumar

Ambedkar cartoon controversy

In the wake of the controversy over the Nehru/Ambedkar cartoon in NCERT textbooks, Havovi Wadia and Arun Kumar point out the folly of seeing children as empty vessels and passive absorbers of information, incapable of engaging actively with the learning process

The row in parliament on May 13, 2012 over a cartoon in the NCERT textbook on political science (Class XI) has brought to the surface assumptions, prejudices and fears that have always brewed in public discourse in India.

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»RTE as a social experiment towards equality By Rakesh Shukla
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»A dismal report card By Chitta Behera
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»Numbers, at the cost of quality? By Anu Kumar
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News

8% of primary school teachers in Bihar fail Class V test

Around 8,000 teachers were unable to answer simple questions on science, math, English and Hindi and will lose their jobs if they fail a second time

After a major report on the state of education showed up the poor quality of education in the country despite higher enrolment figures (see High-enrolment-but-poor-quality-education-says-annual-education-report), the focus should naturally shift to quality of teaching.

This is what the Bihar government is doing after discovering that the level of knowledge of its teachers is poor. Eight per cent of teachers could not pass a paper set for Class V students.

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»Bihar becomes first state to put school information online
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»High enrolment but poor quality education, says annual education report
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»Premji's massive donation highlights importance of education
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Books & Reports

A School for everyone

By Anuradha Kumar

The Beautiful TreeA new take on private schools in developing countries, which sees them not as money-making machines exploiting the poor, but as a much needed asset that can help fulfil the goal of a decent education for all

In his autobiography, My Experiments with Truth, Mahatma Gandhi writes of the visit of a school inspector. The teacher was anxious that every pupil he tutored got his spellings right and so when the young Mohandas misspelled the word ‘kettle’, the teacher did his best to prompt him or hint that he cheat from a classmate who had the correct spelling.

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»Elementary education: Kerala tops, Bihar lags, Muslim enrolment poor
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»Bihar fails India's elementary education test, but its kids are bright
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»Meeting the MDG of gender parity in basic education
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Stories of Change

Village girls in Rajasthan get a leg-up

By Deepti Priya Mehrotra

Rajasthan’s Barmer district, girls’ education

Residential balika shikshan shivirs (girls’ education camps), set up by the Society to Uplift Rural Economy in Rajasthan’s Barmer district, encourage girls to get away from everyday chores in the home and pursue their education

In Rajasthan’s Barmer district, girls’ education is a low priority for most local families. Although they are integral to the family economy -- they help manage households, take care of younger siblings, and work in agriculture and animal husbandry -- girls have traditionally never been allowed to study. 

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»The 3.30 revolution By Vaidehi Iyer
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»MP's education entrepreneurs
By Deepti Priya Mehrotra
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»Full marks for changing lives By Tarannum
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Changemakers

Paying girls to stay in school

By Yamini Deenadayalan

Sam  Virendra Singh

The problem of the girl-child in India is an economic one, former corporate chief Virendra Singh realised. His Pardada Pardadi school in Anoopshahr, UP, keeps girls in school by offering them three meals a day, ten rupees for every day they attend school, a bicycle after two years and a toilet at home after three years.

Sam (Virendra Singh) retired as one of the top bosses at DuPont. But instead of settling down in a shiny happy American suburb, he returned to Anoopshahr, a small village in Uttar Pradesh’s Bulandshahr district, to start a girl’s school that pays girls to stay in school.

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»'All out-of-school children must be considered child labour': Shamshad Khan By Rashme Sehgal
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»Rehmat Fazalbhoy: A wider vision By Bulbul Pal
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»Marie Christine de Rochemonteix:A school with heart By Sarika Jain Antony
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Statistics

Changes in education expenditure over the years

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Expenditure on Education in India

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Gross Drop-out Rate in Primary, Middle and Secondary Schools in India

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Number of Teachers, by Type of Schools, from 1950-51 to 2000-01

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