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Sat23Jul2016

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India is home to the largest number of AIDS orphans in the world

By Aditi Sen

Children in HIV/AIDS-affected households begin to suffer even before a parent or caregiver has died. Household income plummets, schooling is interrupted and many children are forced to work or care for a sick parent. But India has no national policy to address the impact of HIV/AIDS on children in particular

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Children on the mean streets of Chennai

By Sumithra Thangavelu

Unprecedented rains in Chennai over the last few months have destroyed the homes and possessions of hundreds of poor slum and pavement-dwellers. The worst-affected are children

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The problem of child labour intensifies in UP's carpet belt

By Rashme Sehgal

The campaign against child labour began in the carpet belt of Uttar Pradesh in the late-1970s. Three decades on, what has changed? Our correspondent travelled through the Mirzapur-Bhadohi belt, where children are hard at work making tufted carpets for the global market

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Back to school

By Freny Manecksha

Part of a campaign to eliminate child labour in five districts of Maharashtra, the staff of Tandulwadi's government school and the local community have transformed the school and lured dropouts and child labourers back into its cheerful classrooms

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Sting operation to find 'missing' girl-child

By Durga Chandran

Sting operations are not conducted by the media and law-enforcement agencies alone. The Satara-based CSO, Dalit Mahila Vikas Mandal, has nabbed seven doctors red-handed for violating the Pre-Conception and Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques Act and revealing the sex of foetuses

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Delhi's skewed sex ratio: "24,000 girls go missing every year"

By Rashme Sehgal

Delhi's sex ratio has become more and more skewed over the years. One study of families which already have one or more daughters shows just 219 girls being born for every 1,000 boys

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Semi-literate, and saving lives

By Freny Manecksha

Nine months ago, in one of India's least-developed districts, Malika was born, premature and underweight, with pneumonia, umbilical sepsis and hypothermia. This is the story of how she survived, thanks to the efforts of village health worker Gandhara Bhagde

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Children of the sea

By Freny Manecksha

For weeks after the tsunami, children in the fishing villages around Chennai displayed signs of trauma, and viewed the sea that had engulfed their homes and disrupted their lives with fear. Four months after the disaster, they're returning to school, and returning also, to the giving sea

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Rehabilitating children: Adoption is not the answer

By Mari Marcel Thekaekara

In Gujarat, the government banned the adoption of children orphaned by the quake. In Orissa after the supercyclone, women and orphaned children were housed in Mamta Grihas within villages. After the tsunami, the adoption of orphaned children is being seriously discussed, even though it's clear that children flourish in their own cultural context

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On the road with village health workers

By Freny Manecksha

Ankur, a home-based neo-natal care programme based on the acclaimed SEARCH model, is operative in 11 villages of Osmanabad district in Maharashtra. The programme is making a tangible difference to the health of infants and mothers. Freny Manecksha goes on night calls through the twisting lanes of Chauhanwadi with two village health workers

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Fear and loathing in god's own country

By Max Martin

Akshara (8) and Ananthu (6) have been boycotted at school and in their village of Kodiyoor in Kerala because they are HIV-positive. Following pressure from several quarters, they have now been allotted a separate room at school in which to study, and a new teacher

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Orissa's child domestic workers: The 'nowhere' children

By Manipadma Jena

In a state where 48% live below the poverty line, and where natural disasters take their toll every year, it is not surprising that the population of child labour has increased by 15%. Many of these children work as domestic workers, abused, burnt and exploited in every way

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Bal Sansads: Members of Parliament at 11

By Lalitha Sridhar

As India constitutes its 14th Parliament in New Delhi, 4,000 children in Tilonia, Rajasthan, have elected 56 members of parliament to their fifth Bal Sansad. The Bal Sansad is a novel way to teach children about democratic processes. But it's not just about role-playing: children are actually responsible for school administration and solving local problems such as water management

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Pioneering government-NGO partnership to manage juvenile homes

By Lalitha Sridhar

Vidya Shankar, chairperson of the State Juvenile Welfare Board and founder-director of the NGO Relief Foundation, has pioneered Chennai's first government-NGO partnership for the management of juvenile homes

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Orissa's IMR Mission

By Elisa Patnaik

Orissa has the highest infant mortality rate in the country at 97 per 1,000 live births. Approximately 86,000 infants die in the state each year. Poor healthcare facilities for mother and child, malnutrition, malaria and lack of awareness are major contributing factors. Can the state reduce IMR to the targeted 60/1,000 by 2005?

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Forced underground: Child labour in India's carpet belt

By Rashme Arora

Media attention worldwide has only forced the practice of child labour in the carpet weaving industry of UP, Jharkhand and Bihar underground. In several towns and villages that this reporter travelled to across three North Indian states, children continue to work the looms, but behind closed and guarded doors. Child labour is a fact of life say both factory-owners and parents of the children working here. If they do not work, how will they eat?

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Cash can't end discrimination

By Sakuntala Narasimhan

Will the recently announced cash incentives to poor mothers giving birth to girls really help to discourage female infanticide, female foeticide or the pervasive neglect of girl-children?

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The barber's wife: Sex advisor to child brides

By Pamela Bhagat

In the Terai region of Uttar Pradesh, where no family planning campaign has ever penetrated, it is the Naun or barber's wife who accompanies child brides to their husbands' homes at puberty and advises them on family planning and family welfare. This traditional practice does not seem likely to change in the foreseeable future

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