Infochange India

Human rights

Sat 2Aug2014

You are here: Home | Human rights | No man's land

'Civilising the uncivilised'

By Geetashree

Around 40% of the children evacuated by the Salwa Judum to camps in Chhattisgarh are not in school. Some of them are being “adopted” by ashrams like the Chhattisgarh Jana Kalyan Sangh which aims to “civilise the uncivilised tribal children”. Eleven-year-old Naampodium Lacchu is now called Akash, and is well on the way to losing his tribal identity

Read more...

'What wrong have we done?'

By Geetashree

On January 9, 2009, police in Bastar announced a historic victory over the Maoists. They had killed 19 of them in an encounter. Geetashree travelled to four villages of Dantewada district and was told a different story – of 19 tribal men randomly rounded up and shot

Read more...

Fire in the forest

By Geetashree

As many as 3,800 civilians in Dantewada and Bijapur districts – tribals and non-tribals – have joined the Salwa Judum as special police officers. Most of them are young men, but there are plenty of children too. This part of our ongoing series from Chhattisgarh describes how ordinary villagers have been drawn into the pitched battle between Salwa Judum and the Maoists

Read more...

Inside the camps: "We have been left to die here"

Geetashree journeys through Dantewada district, Chhattisgarh, through deserted villages and into the government camps where the herded tribals are literally starving, with no healthcare, no sanitation and almost no way to earn a livelihood. This is Part 2 of a series on the tribals of Chhattisgarh caught between the Maoists and the Salwa Judum

Read more...

Caught between the Maoists and the Salwa Judum

By Geetashree

In forest- and mineral-rich Dantewada district of Chhattisgarh, at least 300,000 tribals have been displaced in the face-off between the Maoists and the state-sponsored Salwa Judum. Their villages have been “evacuated” and some 50,000 moved to “safe” government camps. The rest have migrated to neighbouring states. This is the first in a series researched as part of the Infochange Media Fellowships 2008

Read more...